Global Statistics

All countries
588,103,191
Confirmed
Updated on August 6, 2022 7:57 pm
All countries
557,400,727
Recovered
Updated on August 6, 2022 7:57 pm
All countries
6,434,829
Deaths
Updated on August 6, 2022 7:57 pm

Global Statistics

All countries
588,103,191
Confirmed
Updated on August 6, 2022 7:57 pm
All countries
557,400,727
Recovered
Updated on August 6, 2022 7:57 pm
All countries
6,434,829
Deaths
Updated on August 6, 2022 7:57 pm
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Can Cancer Patients Get Covid Vaccine

What Did The Study Find

Can kids with cancer get the COVID-19 vaccine? Here’s what we know.

Led by researchers at The Francis Crick Institute and Kings College London, the SOAP study involved 205 volunteers 54 people who didnt have cancer and 151 people with cancer who were undergoing immunosuppressive treatment .

Researchers measured the level of antibodies in the volunteers blood to examine their immune response to the COVID-19 virus. The study has shown that detectable antibody responses at week 3 following the first dose of the vaccine were found in:

  • 38% of the group with solid cancers
  • 18% of the group with blood cancers
  • 94% of the group without cancer

The study found that when the second dose was given at this point , immune responses were found in 95% of the group with solid cancers 14 days later . Not enough participants with blood cancer received a second dose to know if this improved their response.

In contrast, those with cancer who did not get this second dose at 3 weeks saw no real improvement at 5 weeks:

  • 30% of the group with solid cancers
  • 11% of the group with blood cancers
  • 86% of the group without cancer

The researchers suggest these results could show that a gap of 12 weeks between doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine could leave many cancer patients vulnerable to severe COVID-19. The study does not suggest that people who were treated for cancer some time ago might be less likely to have a positive response to a single dose the vaccine.

What About Caregivers Of Those With Cancer Should They Be A Priority Group For Vaccination

This is an underappreciated question. Theres no doubt that if you think about a vaccine strategy, if we assume that people with cancer arent going to respond as well to the COVID-19 vaccine, one of the best ways to protect them is to give the vaccine to people who will respond well. And that means anybody who they spend time with. So, anybody who is a caregiver, a loved one, or is in close contact with somebody with cancer, its important for them to get vaccinated.

Because the thought is that, first, it will decrease the caregivers risk of developing symptomatic infections and data suggest that symptomatic people are more likely to transmit the virus to people around them.

And, two, we hope that available vaccines may prevent transmissionalthough available studies evaluating this question are ongoing. If true, then caregivers and loved ones getting vaccinated will really help. Because that cocooning effect, vaccinating the close contacts around people with cancer, can provide extra protection.

NCI information specialists are available to help answer your questions about coronavirus and cancer Monday through Friday 9:00 a.m.9:00 p.m. ET.

Are There Special Precautions That People With Cancer Should Take

People with cancer, people who are in active cancer treatment, older patients, and people with other serious chronic medical conditions, such as lung disease, diabetes, or heart disease, are at higher risk for the more severe form of COVID-19 that could lead to death. Studies have shown that people with active or progressing cancer may be at higher risk than those whose cancer is in remission. The same rules apply for people with cancer as for those without cancer: Be sure to wash your hands well. Avoid touching your face, and avoid close contact with people who are sick.

People who are at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19 should think carefully about non-essential travel during the COVID-19 pandemic, especially if the travel will involve areas with high or increasing rates of COVID-19. This is especially important for people who have not yet been fully vaccinated against COVID-19. If you are not vaccinated, stay at home to reduce your exposure to the virus, practice physical distancing, and avoid social gatherings, including smaller gatherings with family or friends who don’t live with you. Wear a face covering or mask, and make your trip out as brief as possible. If you have been vaccinated and live in an area with low COVID-19 transmission rates, you are able to return to normal activities. In places with high or increasing rates of COVID-19, masking is still important. Always follow local government guidelines for masking and social distancing.

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When And Where Can People Affected By Cancer Receive Their Covid

All people in Australia aged 5 years or older are eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine now.

For people affected by cancer, decisions about when and where to receive the COVID-19 vaccine may be made on an individual basis by the person affected by cancer, in consultation with their healthcare team.

Vaccines are available through Commonwealth Vaccine Clinics, participating general practices, Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services, state and territory-operated vaccination clinics, and community pharmacies. In addition, the Royal Flying Doctor Service is providing vaccinations in some remote communities.

For more information about where the COVID-19 vaccines will be available, visit:

July Guidance For The Clinically Extremely Vulnerable From 19july

COVID

The Government hasfor those in England who have been identified as Clinically Extremely Vulnerable from the 19of July, the date that current restrictions will come to an end.

The statement advises those who are CEV to follow the same guidance as everyone else when restrictions are lifted next week.

However, depending on someones individual circumstances, the advice suggests that you may wish to think particularly carefully about additional precautions you might wish to continue to take. These include taking precautions when meeting others you do not usually meet to reduce the risk of catching or spreading COVID-19, such as meeting outside where possible.

We understand that the change to restrictions may be of concern to cancer patients. In line with government advice we encourage all cancer patients to have both doses of the vaccine when offered, and those considered vulnerable to have the booster jab, if and when it becomes available.

There is different guidance for clinically extremely vulnerable people living inScotland, living inWalesand living inNorthern Ireland.

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Were People With Cancer Included In The Initial Clinical Trials For The Covid

People with cancer were not included in the initial clinical trials for the COVID-19 vaccines. This is because clinical trials typically need to see whether the vaccines will work in people with healthy immune systems.27 However, data on the safety and effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccines for people affected by cancer is being collected from studies and vaccination programs in Australia and internationally. Cancer Australia is monitoring this data and regularly updates these FAQs as new information and evidence emerges.

The Mrna Vaccines: Pfizer And Moderna

The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines work by using genetic material called messenger RNA . The mRNA vaccines contain a small piece of the coronaviruss mRNA, which tells your body to make copies of a protein in the virus called the spike protein. Your immune system then builds up immune cells and special proteins to fight the spike protein. So, if youre ever exposed to the COVID-19 virus, your immune system is ready to recognize the virus and protect you from infection.

Understanding the COVID-19 Vaccineswith Hana El Sahly, M.D.Listen to the episode to learn how the mRNA vaccines work, the differences between the two, and the safety and effectiveness of the vaccines in people with weakened immune systems.

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What Is A Vaccine How Does It Work

Vaccines are a way of producing an immune response in the body without causing illness. Vaccines strengthen a persons immune system by training it to recognise and fight against specific infections.

Vaccines use weakened viruses or parts of the virus to make our bodies think we have already had a particular disease. When a person is vaccinated against a disease, their immune system can quickly recognise and clear out bacteria and viruses that can cause serious illnesses from that disease.

How Does The Covid

COVID-19 vaccine questions answered. Penn State Cancer Institute

In order to understand the effectiveness of the vaccine in different individuals, its helpful to know how the vaccine works. The COVID-19 vaccines give our body a set of instructions to make a protein specific to the virus that we are trying to protect against. The bodys immune cells recognize that the protein does not belong and fight it off by creating antibodies.

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We All Need To Remain Cautious About Covid

Its important to be aware that some people with cancer tend to have weakened immune systems, which might make the vaccines less effective. Right now, the mRNA vaccines offer 94 and 95% protection from this virus while the Johnson & Johnson vaccine 66% effective in preventing moderate and severe COVID-19 disease 28 days after vaccination and 85% effective in preventing hospitalization. But its difficult to tell if cancer patients will have that same level.

Its crucial that we all continue to follow safety recommendations for a while longer, including handwashing, following social and physical distancing guidelines and to continue wearing a face mask even after youve been vaccinated.

And What About Those Who May Be Undergoing Treatment Soon Such As Somebody Just Diagnosed With Cancer Or Whose Treatment Has Been Delayed By The Pandemic

The approach we discussed in the NCCN committee is that we really dont want to create guidance that will prevent cancer patients from getting vaccinated. If you start trying to nuance it for the right time, it may mean that many patients wont get the vaccine. So, the best approach is to get the vaccine when you can.

Still, there are some caveats. We do recommend delays for patients undergoing stem cell transplant and those getting induction therapy for leukemia. In addition, cancer patients who are about to undergo surgery should probably wait for a week until after surgery to get vaccinated. Because we dont want any potential side effects from the vaccinefor example, a feverto potentially delay their surgery.

So, there are some specific exceptions, but we tried to limit restrictions.

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Why Do Immunocompromised People Need An Additional Dose Of The Covid

For a vaccine to protect you, it must activate your immune system. In some immunocompromised patients, this ability is impaired, so an additional dose can boost the immune response.

According to the CDC, among severely immunocompromised people who had undergone solid organ transplant and had virtually no protection after receiving two doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, 30 to 50% developed antibodies protecting them from COVID-19 after getting an additional dose.

MSK researchers have found that the COVID-19 vaccines may not be as effective in people with certain blood cancers. A study led by medical oncologist David Chung found that people with blood cancers have a weakened antibody response to the vaccines, both due to the cancer itself and because of treatments for the disease. Another study, led by Roni Tamari and Gunjan Shah, found that people who had received bone marrow transplants or other cellular therapies for their cancer within the previous year also got less protection from the vaccines.

Can People With Cancer Get The Covid

Should Cancer Patients get the COVID

COVID-19 vaccines can be co-administered with a flu vaccine .12

COVID-19 vaccines can also be co-administered with other vaccines, if required however, there is limited evidence on the co-administration of COVID-19 vaccines with other vaccines, and there is a potential for an increase in mild to moderate side effects when more than one vaccine is given at the same time.12

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How Well Do The Vaccines Work For People With Cancer

Specialists agree that the vaccines are safe for most people. It includes those having systemic anti cancer therapy . . Systemic anti cancer therapy includes treatments such as chemotherapy. It can cause a weakened immune system .

A weakened immune system means it might not work as normal. It can’t protect the body against infections.

So, having the vaccines with a weakened immune system may cause the body to not form enough antibodies. As a result, it might not create enough antibodies to give protection against the virus.

This means that people with a weakened immune system, who had the vaccine, should continue to protect themselves. This way they can reduce their risk of infection.

Should Cancer Patients And Survivors Get The Vaccine

Many expert medical groups recommend that most people with cancer or a history of cancer get the COVID-19 vaccine once its available to them. This includes people who have already had COVID-19.

The main concern about getting the vaccine is not whether its safe for people with cancer, but about how effective it will be, especially in people with weakened immune systems. Some cancer treatments like chemotherapy , radiation, stem cell or bone marrow transplant, or immunotherapy can affect the immune system, which might make the vaccine less effective. People with certain types of cancers, like leukemias or lymphomas, can also have weakened immune systems which might make the vaccine less effective.

Although we dont have specific information yet on how effective the vaccines might be in people being treated for cancer, its possible that the vaccines might not be as effective in people with weakened immune systems as compared to people with healthy immune systems. Despite this, experts still recommend that most cancer patients get the vaccine because those with a fragile immune system are at risk for severe COVID-19 disease, so getting even some protection from the vaccine is better than not having any protection. For people with a weakened immune system who are fully vaccinated , the CDC also has recommendations on getting an additional dose of COVID-19 vaccine. See Should I get a COVID-19 vaccine booster?

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December Fifthvaccine Begins Clinical Trials In Uk

Speciality vaccine company Valneva is the latestto begin clinical trials of their COVID-19 vaccine, currently being developed in West Lothianin Scotland.

The Valneva trial will begin by testingthe safety and efficacyof the vaccineon volunteers at 4 sites across theUKand iscurrently enrolling150healthy participants aged 18to55.

TheValnevavaccine iswhatsknown as an inactivated whole virus vaccine.While the vaccine does hold some of the samevirus particlesthat cause COVID-19, they are weakened and made inactive so that theycannot give you the virus.But they are able toprime the immune system to be able to recognise and destroythe virus responsible for COVID-19,whichmayprevent you from getting sickif youre exposed to the virus in the future.

October New Study Assesses Cancer Patients Response To The Covid

Should someone with cancer get the COVID-19 vaccine?

Results from the CAPTURE study have been published today in the journal Nature Cancer, which looked to understand the level of protection the Pfizer/BioNTech and Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccines give to people with cancer.

The study looked at 585 people with different types of cancer, and supports previous findings that people with cancer, especially those with blood cancer, dont develop as strong a response to the vaccine compared to people who dont have cancer.

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What About Patients On Endocrine Therapies And Other Non

When it comes to non-cytotoxic therapies such as PARP inhibitors or anti-hormonal therapies often used in breast and prostate cancer management, Lyman said vaccinating should be fine.

âI would treat these patients as I would the general population â or someone who was months or years out from treatment who has a relatively active immune response,â he said.

July Guidance For The Clinically Extremely Vulnerable From 19 July

The Government has for those in England who have been identified as Clinically Extremely Vulnerable from the 19 of July, the date that current restrictions will come to an end.

The statement advises those who are CEV to follow the same guidance as everyone else when restrictions are lifted next week.

However, depending on someones individual circumstances, the advice suggests that you may wish to think particularly carefully about additional precautions you might wish to continue to take. These include taking precautions when meeting others you do not usually meet to reduce the risk of catching or spreading COVID-19, such as meeting outside where possible.

We understand that the change to restrictions may be of concern to cancer patients. In line with government advice we encourage all cancer patients to have both doses of the vaccine when offered, and those considered vulnerable to have the booster jab, if and when it becomes available.

There is different guidance for clinically extremely vulnerable people living in Scotland, living in Wales and living in Northern Ireland.

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Is Any Data Being Collected About Covid

Data about the use of the COVID-19 vaccines can help us better understand the COVID-19 vaccination rates for people affected by cancer.

45 and Up COVID Insights rapid online survey results – COVID-19 vaccination rate in people with cancer

Cancer Australia is delighted to have had the opportunity to include questions about cancer patients and carers in the Sax Institute’s recent 45 and Up COVID Insights rapid online survey, to understand more about the COVID-19 vaccine experiences in Australian cancer patients and their carers. 45 and Up COVID Insights is funded through a NSW Health COVID-19 Research Grant.

The 45 and Up Study is Australias largest ongoing study of health and ageing, following over 250,000 participants in NSW aged 45 and over since 2006. The 45 and Up COVID Insights is a series of rapid online surveys of a subgroup of 32,117 participants in the 45 and Up Study. The series of five surveys commenced in November 2020 and continues until early 2022 exploring the health and social impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. The third survey was completed from 10 June to 1 September 2021, with a total of 27,016 participants.

25% of respondents in the survey reported ever having a cancer diagnosis . Of these, 31% had received cancer treatment in the last 12 months. The main treatment was surgery . Other treatments include radiotherapy , chemotherapy and immunotherapy .

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