Global Statistics

All countries
576,274,572
Confirmed
Updated on July 26, 2022 10:32 am
All countries
544,409,230
Recovered
Updated on July 26, 2022 10:32 am
All countries
6,405,377
Deaths
Updated on July 26, 2022 10:32 am

Global Statistics

All countries
576,274,572
Confirmed
Updated on July 26, 2022 10:32 am
All countries
544,409,230
Recovered
Updated on July 26, 2022 10:32 am
All countries
6,405,377
Deaths
Updated on July 26, 2022 10:32 am
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Is The Covid Vaccine Magnetic

Myth: The Ingredients In Covid

Are COVID Vaccines Turning Us Magnetic? Here’s The Truth | NewsMo

FACT: Nearly all the ingredients in COVID-19 vaccines are also ingredients in many foods fats, sugars, and salts.

Exact vaccine ingredients vary by manufacturer. Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines also contain messenger RNA and the Johnson & Johnson/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine contains a harmless version of a virus unrelated to the virus that causes COVID-19. These give instructions to cells in your body to create an immune response. This response helps protect you from getting sick with COVID-19 in the future. After the body produces an immune response, it discards all the vaccine ingredients just as it would discard any information that cells no longer need. This process is a part of normal body functioning.

COVID-19 vaccines do NOT contain ingredients like preservatives, tissues , antibiotics, food proteins, medicines, latex, or metals.

Learn more about what ingredients are and are not in Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, or Johnson & Johnson/Janssen COVID-19 vaccines.

Videos Showing Magnetic Objects Sticking To The Arms Of Recipients Are Being Shared Widely On Social Media Raising Doubts About The Safety Of Covid

Pixabay

Several social media posts claiming that COVID-19 vaccines can make people magnetic are doing rounds on the internet. Videos showing magnetic objects sticking to the arms of vaccine recipients are also being shared widely on social media, raising doubts about the safety of the vaccines.

Recently, a 71-year-old citizen from Nashik claimed that steel objects were sticking to his hands after taking the second dose of the Covishield vaccine. In a video that has now gone viral, Arvind Sonar can be seen sticking coins and steel to his arm after receiving vaccine jabs.

The senior citizen had taken a second dose of the vaccine at a private hospital two days ago. After learning about magnetism from social media, Sonar tried the trick on himself. He noticed that iron and steel object, mostly coins and spoons were sticking to his body.

Why Do Some People Get Side Effects After Covid

Temporary side effects including headache, fatigue and fever are signs the immune system is revving up — a normal response to vaccines. And theyre common.

Here’s whats happening: The immune system has two main arms, and the first kicks in as soon as the body detects a foreign intruder. White blood cells swarm to the site, prompting inflammation thats responsible for chills, soreness, fatigue and other side effects.

This rapid-response step of your immune system tends to wane with age, one reason younger people report side effects more often than older adults. Also, some vaccines simply elicit more reactions than others. Behind the scenes, the shots also set in motion the second part of your immune system, which will provide real protection from the virus by producing antibodies.

Also Check: Antigen Test At Cvs

Vaccine Ingredients Aren’t Magnetic

The lists of ingredients for all threecoronavirusvaccines approved for emergency use are publicly available online. None of them include magnetic substances.

“Receiving a COVID-19 vaccine will not make you magnetic, including at the site of vaccination which is usually your arm,” the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says on its website. “All COVID-19 vaccines are free from metals such as iron, nickel, cobalt, lithium, and rare earth alloys, as well as any manufactured products such as microelectronics, electrodes, carbon nanotubes, and nanowire semiconductors.”

The primary ingredient in coronavirus vaccines from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna is messenger RNA . Those molecules contain genetic information that teaches cells how to make the spike protein on the surface of the coronavirus, eliciting an immune response.

The remaining ingredients in the Pfizer vaccine include lipids , salts and sugar . Moderna’s vaccine also has those ingredients, as well as acids and acid stabilizers.

Johnson & Johnson’s coronavirus vaccine is a little different.

Instead of mRNA, the shot uses a modified, harmless version of the common cold to carry the gene sequence for the spike protein. Once inside a cell, the virus body disintegrates and the genetic material travels to the nucleus, where it’s transcribed into mRNA. Other ingredients in the Johnson & Johnson vaccine include acids, salts, sugars and ethanol.

The Claim: Magnetism Was Added To Covid

Covid

Side effects from the coronavirus vaccines can include fatigue, headache, fever, and according to some anti-vaccine advocates magnetism.

On June 9, Dr. Sherri Tenpenny, author of “Saying No to Vaccines,” testified before Ohio lawmakers on a bill that would curtail COVID-19 vaccine requirements in the state. Tenpenny said the coronavirus spike protein that results from vaccination has “a metal attached to it.”

“I’m sure you’ve seen the pictures all over the internet of people who have had these shots and now they’re magnetized,” Tenpenny, a physician based in suburban Cleveland, said during the House Health Committee hearing. “You can put a key on their forehead, it sticks. You can put spoons and forks all over and they can stick because now we think there is a metal piece to that.”

Another health care provider who testified during the hearing, Joanna Overholt, tried to prove that claim during the hearing.

Fact check:COVID-19 vaccines don’t cause magnetic reactions or contain tracking devices

“Explain to me why the key sticks to me. It sticks to my neck too,” Overholt said after failing to get a key to stick to her neck

The claim that the coronavirus vaccines are magnetic has circulated online for more than a month, according to First Draft, a nonprofit that tracks online misinformation. One recent version of the claim, a video published June 7 on Rumble, says magnetism was “intentionally added to ‘vaccine’ to force mRNA through entire body.”

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The Unfiltered Truth Behind Human Magnetism Vaccines And Covid

    A hammer appears to stick to a man’s skin with no adhesives or other interventions. While this may … appear to be an example of human magnetism, no external magnetic field can be detected, and non-magnetic objects “stick” just as well. The phenomenon of variable skin stickiness is likely the culprit, not magnetism of any type.

    Henry Assen / Wikimedia Commons / CCA-SA-3.0

    Every once in a while, a claim comes along that wildly challenges the mainstream scientific narrative. These challenges can occasionally serve as the seed for a revolution in our understanding of some aspect of the world, but much more frequently, the novel claims simply fail to pan out. Oftentimes, the very nature of the claim itself is suspect, and based on a misunderstanding of already known and established facts. Regardless of whats being claimed, however, we can always anchor ourselves by beginning with a scientifically sound starting point, and then examine the viability of those new claims through that lens.

    Recently, Dr. Sherri Tenpenny has claimed that the coronavirus vaccine is actively magnetizing people, stating in her testimony, “I’m sure you’ve seen the pictures all over the internet of people who have had these shots and now they’re magnetized. You can put a key on their forehead, it sticks. You can put spoons and forks all over and they can stick because now we think there is a metal piece to that.”

    getty

    Learning Points For Clinicians

    This case report aimed to remind the clinicians of the potentially alternative treatment to manage the cochleopathy after the administration of the PfizerBioNTech coronavirus disease 2019 vaccine. The repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation might be beneficial to manage the immune reaction-associated cochleopathy.

    Recommended Reading: Covid Test Cost Cvs

    Myth: Receiving A Covid

    FACT: Receiving a COVID-19 vaccine will not make you magnetic, including at the site of vaccination which is usually your arm.

    COVID-19 vaccines do not contain ingredients that can produce an electromagnetic field at the site of your injection. All COVID-19 vaccines are free from metals.

    Learn more about the ingredients in the COVID-19 vaccinations authorized for use in the United States.

    Nurses Attempt To Prove Vaccines Make People Magnetic Hilariously Backfires

    Fact Check: There Are No Magnets In Your Covid Vaccine

    An anti-vaccine Ohio nurse attempted on Tuesday to prove that COVID-19 vaccines make people magnetic, but to use a gymnastics term she failed to stick the landing.

    Registered nurse Joanna Overholt, testifying before the Ohio House health committee about what she said were potential coronavirus vaccine dangers, tried to use her own body as proof.

    Overholt said she heard during lunch that vaccines cause magnetism in humans, so she decided to prove her point on herself by attempting to show how a bobby pin and a key would stick to her exposed skin.

    Spoiler alert: It didnt go well.

    Explain to me why the key sticks to me. It sticks to my neck, too, Overholt said. So, yeah, if somebody could explain this, that would be great. The nonmagnetic aluminum key actually fell off her neck as soon as she removed her. hand.

    Wow. An anti-vaccine nurse in Ohio tried to prove the Vaccines Cause Magnetism theory in an state legislative committee. The demonstration did not go to plan

    Also Check: Cvs Nasal Swab Test

    Covid Vaccine Magnet Challenge Videos Debunked By Scientists

    Over the course of the coronavirus pandemic, various conspiracy theories surrounding the COVID-19 vaccine have arisen, with one of the most popular pieces of false information being that the shots contain microchips.

    Now, scientists have debunked another trend related to this conspiracy theory that has been circulating widely on social mediathe so-called COVID vaccine magnet challenge.

    Recently, videos have emerged on social media platforms such as and TikTok, in which people place small magnets on the arm of someone who has purportedly received a COVID-19 vaccine shot.

    The magnets appear to stick to the arm on the site where the COVID-19 vaccine shot was allegedly administered . But experts told Newsweek that a magnet will not stick to someone’s arm because of the injection.

    Edward Hutchinson, a lecturer with the Centre for Virus Research at the University of Glasgow in Scotland, told Newsweek, that, first of all, the coronavirus vaccine was not produced using materials that are particularly magnetic.

    Heres another ppffizer magnet video. More evidence mounting.

    Hermit Rambler May 11, 2021

    “Thirdly, even if it was plausible why would this have any bearing on whether the vaccine is workingit doesn’t.”

    Star Wars – Produced – Ettore Stratta

    Oh No – Kreepa

    Freedom Of Information Request On Reports Of Magnetism At Covid

    This publication is licensed under the terms of the Open Government Licence v3.0 except where otherwise stated. To view this licence, visit nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/version/3 or write to the Information Policy Team, The National Archives, Kew, London TW9 4DU, or email: .

    Where we have identified any third party copyright information you will need to obtain permission from the copyright holders concerned.

    This publication is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/freedom-of-information-responses-from-the-mhra-week-commencing-21-june-2021/freedom-of-information-request-on-reports-of-magnetism-at-covid-19-vaccine-injection-sites-foi-21-545

    21st June 2021FOI 21/545

    Dear

    Thank you for your email dated 21st May 2021, where you asked the following:

    It is being widely reported that recipients of the coronavirus vaccines are finding that the vaccine injection site on their arm has become magnetic.

    Can you please tell me:

    1) Whether the MHRA is aware of these reports

    2) Whether the MHRA intends to investigate these reports

    If the MHRA intends to investigate these reports I would like to know

    1) Which vaccine or vaccine batches are linked to this finding, and which are not

    2) Whether there is any component in the vaccine ingredients as listed in the product information leaflet that could account for this phenomenon

    4) Whether the MHRA intends to investigate the possible toxicity to humans of the ingredient responsible for the magnetism

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    Vaccines ‘cannot’ Cause A Magnetic Reaction

    However, the government has clarified that social media posts claiming that COVID-19 vaccines can make people magnetic are baseless. Stating that the vaccines against coronavirus are completely safe, the government added the COVID-19 vaccines cannot cause a magnetic reaction in the human body and do not contain any metal-based ingredients.

    Press Information Bureau’s fact-checking arm said it is common to experience mild side-effects like mild headaches, pain or swelling at the injection site, and mild fever after getting the COVID-19 vaccine, but not magnetic reaction. “Do not fall prey to misinformation about COVID-19 vaccines and get vaccinated,” it further added.

    Several posts/videos claiming that #COVID19#vaccines can make people magnetic are doing the rounds on social media. #PIBFactCheck:COVID-19 vaccines do NOT make people magnetic and are completely SAFERegister for #LargestVaccineDrive now and GET VACCINATED

    PIB Fact Check

    Myth: All Events Reported To The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System Are Caused By Vaccination

    Round Magnet, I Got My COVID

    FACT: Anyone can report events to VAERS, even if it is not clear whether a vaccine caused the problem. Because of this, VAERS data alone cannot determine if the reported adverse event was caused by a COVID-19 vaccination.

    Some VAERS reports may contain information that is incomplete, inaccurate, coincidental, or unverifiable. Vaccine safety experts study these adverse events and look for unusually high numbers of health problems, or a pattern of problems, after people receive a particular vaccine.

    Recently, the number of deaths reported to VAERS following COVID-19 vaccination has been misinterpreted and misreported as if this number means deaths that were proven to be caused by vaccination. Reports of adverse events to VAERS following vaccination, including deaths, do not necessarily mean that a vaccine caused a health problem.

    Learn more about VAERS.

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    Woman Fails To Prove The Covid

    A nurse during an Ohio House hearing on Thursday tried to prove a debunked theory that taking the COVID-19 vaccine makes a person magnetic.

    Joanna Overholt tried to place a key and bobby pin against her body in an effort to prove that both would stick to her skin, though the attempt ultimately failed. Overholt was trying to attest to a conspiracy theory thats been widely circulated by a Cleveland-area physician and anti-vaccine activist, Sherri Tenpenny, who also testified in front of Ohio lawmakers.

    Explain why the key sticks to me, Overholt said during the hearing. In video of her testimony, the key sticks to her for approximately three seconds before she removes it.

    It sticks to my neck too, she added, though she failed to get it to stay. She also attempted to make a bobby pin stick, though that failed as well.

    Overholt testified in favor of the proposed Enact Vaccine Choice and Anti-Discrimination Act, which the Ohio Capital Journal reports would prohibit anyone from mandating or asking people to take a vaccine, including the COVID-19 vaccine.

    Tenpenny has also circulated false claims that the vaccine could interface with 5G cellular towers, The Washington Post reported.

    On the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions page regarding myths and facts about the vaccine, the CDC says that the vaccine cannot make you magnetic.

    What Do Doctors Have To Say About This

    They’re not impressed. “This is stupid. This is completely made up,” infectious disease expert Amesh A. Adalja, MD, senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, tells Health. “There is no new magnetic capacity conferred by being vaccinated.”

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention specifically addresses the whole magnetization thing on its website under “Myths and Facts about COVID-19 Vaccines,” writing, “receiving a COVID-19 vaccine will not make you magnetic, including at the site of vaccination, which is usually your arm.”

    COVID-19 vaccines do not contain ingredients that can produce an electromagnetic field at the site of your injection, the CDC explains, noting that all COVID-19 vaccines are free from metals like iron, nickel, cobalt, lithium, and rare earth alloys, as well as any manufactured products such as microelectronics, electrodes, carbon nanotubes, and nanowire semiconductors.

    The CDC also includes this: “In addition, the typical dose for a COVID-19 vaccine is less than a milliliter, which is not enough to allow magnets to be attracted to your vaccination site even if the vaccine was filled with a magnetic metal.”

    You can also check out the full list of vaccine ingredients to verify, if you want to learn more.

    Also Check: How Much Is Pcr Test At Cvs

    Myths And Facts About Covid

    CDC has updated its recommendations for COVID-19 vaccines with a preference for people to receive an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine . Read CDCs media statement.

    Accurate vaccine information is critical and can help stop common myths and rumors. It can be difficult to know which sources of information you can trust. Learn more about finding credible vaccine information.

    Below are myths and facts about COVID-19 vaccination.

    Where Did People Come Up With The Idea That A Covid Shot Would Make A Magnet Stick To Your Arm

    Conspiracy Theorists Think Covid Vaccine Makes You Magnetic

    It’s hard to say for sure where is started, but magnet idea definitely took off on TikTok, with people both “proving” and disproving that this is a thing.

    It seems as though people see this as “proof” that the COVID-19 vaccine somehow functioned as a way to microchip recipients. But this claim has been refuted time and again. The New York Times specifically tackled the false claim, citing the actual ingredients in Pfizer’s mRNA vaccine, and it didn’t contain any ingredients that even remotely suggested the presence of a microchip. The same goes for the Moderna vaccine, Johnson & Johnson’s single-shot vaccine, or any of the other vaccines being used in other countries.

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