Global Statistics

All countries
547,145,332
Confirmed
Updated on June 23, 2022 9:27 pm
All countries
519,394,584
Recovered
Updated on June 23, 2022 9:27 pm
All countries
6,346,678
Deaths
Updated on June 23, 2022 9:27 pm

Global Statistics

All countries
547,145,332
Confirmed
Updated on June 23, 2022 9:27 pm
All countries
519,394,584
Recovered
Updated on June 23, 2022 9:27 pm
All countries
6,346,678
Deaths
Updated on June 23, 2022 9:27 pm
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What Are Underlying Health Conditions For Covid

Lung Disease And Covid

DHEC releases list of deadliest underlying conditions for COVID-19 patients

Chronic airway and lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease , asthma, pulmonary fibrosis and interstitial lung disease can set the stage for a more severe infection with the new coronavirus because of scarring, inflammation or lung damage.

Its very important for people with these conditions to work with their doctors and ensure they have adequate supplies of maintenance and rescue medications on hand.

What Underlying Health Conditions Qualify For A Booster

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Booster shots for Pfizer vaccine recipients are here, and millions of Americans who completed the initial series at least six months ago are now eligible for the extra dose, including adults under 65 with a range of underlying health conditions.

The decision to cover this group in the booster criteria “reflect the potential increase for severe outcomes” that a person with a chronic disease or other medical condition could experience if they get COVID-19, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Rochelle Walensky, M.D., explained in a Sept. 24 briefing on boosters.

For the latest coronavirus news and advice go to AARP.org/coronavirus.

Emerging research shows that while the vaccines still provide strong protection against hospitalization and death from COVID, their defense against infection begins to wane over time, especially in older adults, who are more likely to get sick if they contract the virus. That is why all adults 65 and up are encouraged to get the booster shot. But Walensky said the data on sustained vaccine effectiveness “are harder to parse out for those with underlying conditions” another group that has been at high risk for severe COVID-19 since the start of the pandemic. “But we’re starting to see those data both here and in other countries,” she added.

  • Booster Side Effects
  • Underlying Conditions & amp Booster Shots

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More on Vaccines

The Pfizer Booster Is Approved For Specific Conditions

CDC Director Rochelle Walensky revealed the decision, which broke with an advisory recommendation that wanted booster approval for a narrower group, Reuters reported. The panel was concerned about heart inflammation, a rare side effect in young men, and difficulties with rolling out a booster. Ultimately, Walensky decided to go with a rollout that more closely aligned with the FDAs recommendations versus the CDC advisory panels.

The CDC and noted:

CDC now recommends that people aged 65 years and older, residents in long-term care settings, and people aged 5064 years with underlying medical conditions should receive a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTechs COVID-19 Vaccine at least 6 months after completing their Pfizer-BioNTech primary series. Other groups may receive a booster shot based on their individual risk and benefit.

  • Residents in long-term care settings
  • Ages 50-64 with underlying medical conditions

You can receive a Pfizer booster six months or more after your second Pfizer dose if you weigh the risks fall in one of the following categories. People in these categories are not being told they should receive a booster, but that they can receive one if they weigh the risks and decide they want one.

  • Ages 18-49 with underlying conditions
  • Ages 18-64 and at increased risk due to occupational or institutional settings

People will not be required to submit documentation to prove risk, Reuters reported.

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How To Reduce Your Risk Of Covid

  • If possible, only leave your home for medically necessary appointments.
  • Stay away from people who are sick.
  • Avoid contact with others, especially those who have travelled or been exposed to the virus.
  • If contact cannot be avoided, take the following precautions:
  • keep at least 2 metres between yourself and the other people
  • give a friendly wave instead of a handshake, kiss or hug
  • keep interactions brief
  • Clean hands frequently with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or, if not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your mouth, nose, and eyes and/or food with your hands.
  • Carry an alcohol-based hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol when you are outside of your home.
  • Avoid touching high-touch surfaces such as doorknobs, handrails and elevator buttons in public places.
  • If you need to touch surfaces in public places, use a tissue or your sleeve to cover your hand.
  • At least once daily, clean and disinfect surfaces that you touch often, like toilets, bedside tables, doorknobs, phones and television remotes.
  • To disinfect, use only approved hard-surface disinfectants that have a Drug Identification Number . A DIN is an 8-digit number given by Health Canada that confirms the disinfectant product is approved and safe for use in Canada.
  • If they can withstand the use of liquids for disinfection, high-touch electronic devices may be disinfected with 70% alcohol at least daily.
  • Avoid crowds and large gatherings.
  • Have Had An Allergic Reaction To Any Vaccine

    COVID

    If youve had a serious or immediate allergic reaction to any vaccine or injection in the past, discuss this with your vaccinator.

    If you have a history of anaphylaxis

    You shouldnt get the Pfizer vaccine if you have a history of anaphylaxis:

    • to any ingredient in the Pfizer vaccine
    • to a previous dose of the Pfizer vaccine.

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    Information On Children And Teens

    While children have been less affected by COVID-19 compared with adults, children can be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 and some children develop severe illness. Children with underlying medical conditions are at increased risk for severe illness compared to children without underlying medical conditions. Current evidence on which underlying medical conditions in children are associated with increased risk is limited. Current evidence suggests that children with medical complexity, with genetic, neurologic, metabolic conditions, or with congenital heart disease can be at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19. Similar to adults, children with obesity, diabetes, asthma or chronic lung disease, sickle cell disease, or immunosuppression can also be at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19. One way to protect the health of children is to ensure that all adults in a household are fully vaccinated against COVID-19.

    Medical Conditions In Adults

    • This list is presented in alphabetical order and not in order of risk.
    • CDC completed an evidence review process for each medical condition on this list to ensure they met criteria for inclusion on this webpage.
    • We are learning more about COVID-19 every day, and this list may be updated as the science evolves.

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    Which Underlying Medical Conditions Qualify People Under 65 For Boosters

    According to the CDC, the following conditions can put someone at higher risk of severe COVID-19 and may be a reason to get a booster: cancer chronic kidney disease chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease , moderate-to-severe asthma, cystic fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension dementia type 1 or type 2 diabetes Down syndrome heart conditions HIV compromised immune system liver disease being overweight or obese pregnancy sickle cell disease being a current or former smoker organ transplant stroke and substance use disorders.

    Can I Get A Booster If I Received The Moderna Or Johnson & Johnson Vaccine

    New Yorkers With Certain Underlying Health Conditions Now Eligible For COVID Vaccination

    No. At this point, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has only authorized Pfizer booster shots for people who received the first two doses of Pfizer, not those who received Moderna or Johnson & Johnson vaccines.

    People who got Moderna or Johnson & Johnson vaccines will have to wait until boosters for those vaccines are authorized. Moderna has submitted initial data to the FDA for authorization of its booster, and Johnson & Johnson has shared some data on its booster with the FDA as well.

    That said, there is one group of Moderna recipients who may now get third shots. In August, the FDA authorized people who received two doses of Moderna and are immunocompromised, because of an organ transplant or certain other conditions, to get third doses of Moderna. People who received two doses of Pfizer and are immunocompromised may also receive third shots of Pfizer, and unlike with the Pfizer booster, they only have to wait 28 days between their second and third shots.

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    Older Adults And Covid

    According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , eight out of 10 deaths in the U.S. from the new coronavirus have been in people 65 and older. An estimated 6% to 29% of people 85 and older who get COVID-19 will require intensive care. Here are some reasons why:

    • Older adults are more likely to have long-term health problems that can put them at risk.
    • Peoples immune systems tend to weaken with age, making it more difficult for older people to fight off infections.
    • Lung tissue becomes less elastic over time, making respiratory diseases like COVID-19 a particular concern for older people.
    • Inflammation in older people can be more intense, causing organ damage.

    Which Underlying Conditions Put Children At Greater Risk

    The CDC reported about children and underlying conditions:

    Children with underlying medical conditions are at increased risk for severe illness compared to children without underlying medical conditions. Current evidence on which underlying medical conditions in children are associated with increased risk is limited. Current evidence suggests that children with medical complexity, with genetic, neurologic, metabolic conditions, or with congenital heart disease can be at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19. Similar to adults, children with obesity, diabetes, asthma or chronic lung disease, sickle cell disease, or immunosuppression can also be at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

    It should be noted that the Pfizer booster is not recommended for anyone under 18.

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    Who Qualifies For A Booster

    For two groups, the CDC was clear: People ages 65 and older and those in long-term care settings and people ages 50 to 64 with underlying medical conditions should get a third shot of Pfizers Covid-19 vaccine at least six months after their first two shots.

    Underlying medical conditions include cancer, diabetes, obesity, pregnancy and kidney disease.

    The recommendations only apply to those who received the first two doses of Pfizer-BioNTechs vaccine, the only vaccine booster authorized by the Food and Drug Administration. Booster shot data for those who got the Moderna or Johnson & Johnson shots are forthcoming, the CDC said.

    Who Can Get A Covid

    Coronavirus  Italian GP with NO underlying health ...

    Only people who got their second doses of the Pfizer vaccine at least six months ago may get booster shots and only if they fall into certain groups.

    Those who should receive the shots include people ages 65 and older and those living in long-term care settings, such as nursing homes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. People ages 50 to 64 with underlying medical conditions should also get Pfizer booster shots.

    Then, there are people who may get Pfizer booster shots, but dont necessarily need to, according to the CDC. Those people must also have received their second doses of the Pfizer vaccine at least six months ago. People ages 18 to 49 with underlying medical conditions may get booster shots based on their individual benefits and risks according to the state health department. People ages 18 to 64 who work in settings where they may be more exposed to COVID-19, such as hospitals, schools and grocery stores, may also get boosters based on their individual benefits and risks.

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    Covid Booster Shots Are Rolling Out What Does That Mean For You

    Health care workers, teachers and other essential personnel have been among the hardest hit by Covid-19 and should qualify for a vaccine booster shot despite a lack of robust evidence that they need a third dose to protect them against severe disease, the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday.

    In a pandemic, we must often take steps with the intention to do the greatest good, even in an uncertain environment, Dr. Rochelle Walensky said Friday during a White House Covid-19 task force briefing.

    Walensky cited the disproportionate impact the pandemic has had on racial and ethnic minority communities as a reason she recommended a booster dose for people 18 and older at high risk of Covid because of “occupational and institutional exposure” against the guidance of the CDC’s advisers.

    “Withholding access for boosters for these people and communities only worsens the inequities that I have committed to fight against,” she said.

    Walensky’s decision to allow millions of Americans over the age of 18 the opportunity to get a booster was an unusual move. She overruled the agency’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, which voted to limit boosters to elderly people and older people with underlying health conditions.

    Where Can I Get A Pfizer Booster Shot

    Pharmacies across Illinois are now administering boosters to Illinois residents. Many local hospital systems had not yet started giving boosters to patients Monday. Some hospital systems are focusing first on offering boosters to their workers.

    Walgreens is accepting walk-ins but encourages people to make appointments to get their boosters at Walgreens.com/ScheduleVaccine or by calling 1-800-Walgreens.

    CVS Health is also strongly encouraging people to make appointments for boosters at CVS.com to ensure the store where they want to get a booster has Pfizer vaccine available.

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    Oregon Man 32 With No Underlying Conditions Dies Of Covid

    OHA’s latest COVID-19 forecast predicts continued declines in daily cases, hospitalizations through mid-October

    Nurses at OHSU care for COVID-19 patients

    PORTLAND, Ore. The Oregon Health Authority reported 23 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon on Friday, raising the states death toll to 3,982.

    OHA reported 1,580 new confirmed and presumptive cases, bringing the state total to 341,113.

    There were 656 hospitalized patients with COVID on Friday, which was a decrease of 43, and 167 patients in ICU beds, which was a decrease of six.

    There were 48 available adult ICU beds out of 688 total and 294 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,229 .

    OHA reported that 14,231 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Oct. 7. The seven-day running average is now 11,947 doses per day.

    Oregon has now administered 3,091,751 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 1,920,720 doses of Moderna and 220,190 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

    To date, 2,765,452 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,546,452 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

    OHAs latest COVID forecast report released on Friday predicts daily cases and hospitalizations to continue dropping through mid-October.

    The report estimates 425 cases per 100,000 people and 78 hospitalizations between Oct. 13 and Oct. 26.

    Are Getting Tested For Covid

    DHEC releases list of deadliest underlying conditions for COVID-19 patients

    If youre waiting for a COVID-19 test result, you should wait until you get a negative result or have met the criteria to stop isolating before you get vaccinated.

    If youve had COVID-19

    You should have the COVID-19 vaccine even if youve had COVID-19 . We recommend you wait at least 4 weeks after you recover before getting the vaccine.

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    Fully Vaccinated Still Protected

    On Friday, Walensky said people should still consider themselves fully vaccinated after getting two doses of a Pfizer or Moderna vaccine or the one-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

    Outside experts stressed that fully vaccinated individuals are not at immediate risk of infection. Israeli dataon the Pfizer shots showed that despite a drop in protection from overall infection, the vaccines remained 93 percent effective in preventing severe illness.

    “This is not an emergency,” said Dr. Jesse Goodman, infectious disease specialist at Georgetown University Medical Center and former chief scientist with the Food and Drug Administration. People who have received both Pfizer doses “are still afforded significant protection.”

    Indeed, it is the unvaccinated population that makes up the vast majority of severely ill Covid patients in hospitals and intensive care units.

    “Infections among the unvaccinated continue to fuel this pandemic resulting in rising numbers of cases, hospitalizations and deaths,” Walensky said Friday.

    The administration’s focus, she added, will be on getting the vaccine to those who have not received a single shot.

    “We will not boost our way out of this pandemic,” she said.

    As of Friday, the CDC reported that just 55.1 percent of the U.S. population had been fully vaccinated against Covid-19.

    People Who Are At Risk Of More Severe Disease Or Outcomes From Covid

    While COVID-19 can make anyone sick, some Canadians are at risk of more severe disease or outcomes because of their age or if they have other medical conditions. If you are at risk of more severe disease or outcomes, you can take action to reduce your risk of getting sick from COVID-19.

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    Summary Of Conditions With Evidence

    An updated list of high-risk underlying conditions, based on what has been reported in the literature, and the level of evidence for risk of severe COVID-19 outcomes are provided below. Updatesto the list of high-risk underlying medical conditions that put adults of any age at increased risk for severe COVID-19 illness were based on evidence from published reports,scientificarticles in press, unreviewed preprints, and internal data. This list of conditions was categorized into four groups primarily based on the study method used in the analyses at the time of review. Some of the conditions listed represent a larger category and some are listed as one specific health condition . This reflects how conditions were defined in studies. For example, ICD-10-CM codes were used in some studies and others used lab codes.

  • Co-morbidities that are supported by meta-analysis/systematic review: Defined as having a significant association with risk of severe COVID-19 illness in at least one meta-analysis or systematic review.
  • Cancer
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