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Global Statistics

All countries
595,168,628
Confirmed
Updated on August 15, 2022 2:15 am
All countries
566,803,948
Recovered
Updated on August 15, 2022 2:15 am
All countries
6,454,572
Deaths
Updated on August 15, 2022 2:15 am
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What Blood Type Is Less Likely To Catch Covid



Individuals With Blood Type O May Have Lowest Risk Of Infection; Individuals With A And Ab May Have Increased Risk Of Severe Clinical Outcomes

— Two studies published today in Blood Advances suggest people with blood type O may have a lower risk of COVID-19 infection and reduced likelihood of severe outcomes, including organ complications, if they do get sick.

As the pandemic continues, the global biomedical research community is working urgently to identify coronavirus risk factors and potential therapeutic targets. The potential role of blood type in predicting risk and complications of COVID-19 infection has emerged as an important scientific question. These new studies add evidence that there may be an association between blood type and vulnerability to COVID-19; however, additional research is needed to better understand why and what it means for patients.

Individuals with blood type O may be less vulnerable to COVID-19 infection

Blood type O may offer some protection against COVID-19 infection, according to a retrospective study. Researchers compared Danish health registry data from more than 473,000 individuals tested for COVID-19 to data from a control group of more than 2.2 million people from the general population. Among the COVID-19 positive, they found fewer people with blood type O and more people with A, B, and AB types.

Blood groups A and AB associated with increased risk of severe clinical outcomes of COVID-19 infection

Blood Advances® is a registered trademark of the American Society of Hematology.

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People With Type O Blood May Be Less Likely To Get The Coronavirus Or Develop Severe Complications New Studies Suggest

Business Insider

  • A growing body of research suggests a link between blood type and coronavirus risk.
  • New studies have found that people with Type O blood have a lower risk of getting the coronavirus and are less likely to get severely sick if they do get infected.
  • Some research has also found that COVID-19 patients with Type O or B blood spent less time in the ICU and were less likely to need a ventilator. 
  • But blood type shouldn’t be used to judge an individual patient’s risk.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Research is coalescing around the idea that people with Type O blood may have a slight advantage during this pandemic. 

Twostudies published this week suggest that people with Type O have a lower risk of getting the coronavirus, as well as a reduced likelihood of getting severely sick if they do get infected.

One of the new studies specifically found that COVID-19 patients with Type O or B blood spent less time in an intensive-care unit than their counterparts with Type A or AB. They were also less likely to require ventilation and less likely to experience kidney failure.

These new findings echo similar findings about Type O blood seen in previous research, creating a clearer picture of one particular coronavirus risk factor.

Recent Studies Reveal That People With Blood Group O Are At Lower Risk Of Contracting The Novel Coronavirus Or Covid

Even as scientists are working around the clock to identify the Covid-19 risk factors, two new studies, that investigated the “potential role of blood type in predicting” the risk, revealed that people with blood group ‘O’ are less vulnerable to the novel coronavirus infection than any other blood type.

Two recent studies published in Blood Advances show that people with blood group O are at lower risk of contracting the Covid-19 or SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Although these new studies provide evidence of a potential link between blood type and vulnerability to Covid-19, additional research is needed to better understand why and what it means for patients, a report in Science daily said.

READ | WHO: Study finds four drugs that have little to no effect on coronavirus

Previous Research Has Shown People With Type A Blood Are Also More Susceptible To Severe Covid Cases

The recent research is far from the only study to consider different blood types and how they present different COVID risks. Other studies have recently found that blood type can affect susceptibility to COVID. In December, researchers from the GenOMICC Consortium, an international association of scientists that study the connections between severe illnesses and genes, compared the genes of more than 2,000 COVID-19 patients in the U.K. with those of healthy people, The Washington Post reports.

Initial research from the same team, published in the journal Nature in October, found that those with type A blood were more likely to develop serious illness when infected with the novel coronavirus. “Blood group A was associated with a higher risk than non-A blood groups,” the authors wrote. And for more COVID news delivered right to your inbox, .

Studies Show Link Between Blood Types From A To O And The Body’s Response To The Coronavirus

Your blood type could make you less likely to catch Covid ...

En español | In the last several months, a number of studies have drawn a connection between blood type and COVID-19 risk, and most have reached the same conclusion: People with type O blood, the most common kind, may have a slight advantage over their peers when it comes to risk for a coronavirus infection and hospitalization or death from COVID-19. This, however, does not mean they can’t contract the virus or fall seriously ill from it.

Researchers in Denmark found that among more than 7,400 people who tested positive for COVID-19, fewer individuals had type O blood compared to type A, despite the fact that the two blood types accounted for the same share of the population when compared to a larger control group. Canadian researchers reached a similar finding in their retrospective study published in Annals of Internal Medicine. They found that people with type O blood had a lower risk for contracting the coronavirus compared to those with type A, B or AB. They also observed that individuals with type O blood had a slightly lower risk for getting severely ill or dying from COVID-19 if they did become infected. And several other peer-reviewed studies reinforce these findings.

For the latest coronavirus news and advice go to AARP.org/coronavirus.

Even still, experts caution that the accumulating evidence on this subject shouldn’t influence everyday medical or public health decisions.

Previous Evidence Offered Complicated View Of Correlation Between Blood Type And Covid

Early in the novel coronavirus pandemic, research suggested that individuals with Type A blood were at an especially high risk of developing a severe case of Covid-19 or dying from the disease.

For example, one preprint study released in June examined blood samples from 1,610 Covid-19 patients who developed severe cases of Covid-19, which the researchers classified as needing oxygen or a ventilator as part of their treatment. The researchers found that many of the patients who had severe cases of Covid-19 possessed the same variant on a gene that determines a person’s blood type, and that having blood type A was linked with a 50% increase in the likelihood a patient would develop a severe case of Covid-19.

In addition, another preprint study conducted by researchers in China found that, out of 2,173 Covid-19 patients, blood type A was associated with a higher risk of death from Covid-19 and a higher risk of contracting the new coronavirus. Those researchers also noted that patients with blood type O appeared to be the least likely to contract the virus.

However, later research revealed a more complicated picture, suggesting that the link between Covid-19 a person’s blood type might not be significant enough to actually alter a person’s risk.

“No one should think they’re protected” because of their blood type, he said.

The Coronavirus Is More Likely To Attach To A Specific Kind Of Type A Blood Cell

The team of scientists at Harvard and Emory conducted a laboratory study to better understand how SARS-CoV-2 interacts with A, B, and O blood types. The researchers focused on the part of the virus known as the receptor binding domain , which the pathogen uses to attach to cells once it enters the body.

The results, which were published in the journal Blood Advances, showed that the virus was more likely to attach to type A cells, specifically the type of blood cells found lining the respiratory system. The virus showed no preference for cells from other blood types or respiratory cells from the B or O blood groups, as Live Science reports.

The study authors believe that their results can help explain why some people are more susceptible to COVID. “It is interesting that the viral RBD only really prefers the type of blood group A antigens that are on respiratory cells, which are presumably how the virus is entering most patients and infecting them,” Sean Stowell, MD, one of the study’s authors from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, said in a statement.

People With Blood Type O Are Less Likely To Catch Coronavirus Study Claims

The findings from two independent studies indicate that people with blood type O are less likely to catch Covid-19 than individuals with blood types A, B and AB

  • 16:26, 10 Nov 2020

People with blood type O are less likely to catch Covid-19, according to new research.

Their risk of severe complications such as organ failure – and even death – is also reduced, say scientists.

But individuals with blood types A and AB are most vulnerable, suggest the findings.

The findings from two independent studies shed fresh light on why the virus is deadly for some – while others are not even aware they have had it.

One team compared Danish health registry data of over 473,000 individuals tested for Covid-19 to a control group of more than 2.2 million from the general population.

There were fewer positive results among those with blood type O – the most common – and more in peers with A, B and AB. Rates of infection were similar in these three groups.

The trends remained after the researchers took into account ethnicity which affects blood group distributions.

Man, 25, becomes first in US to get infected with coronavirus again within 48 days

Lead author Dr Torben Barington, of Odense University Hospital, said: “It is very important to consider the proper control group because blood type prevalence may vary considerably in different ethnic groups and different countries.

It suggests these two blood groups have an increased risk of organ dysfunction or failure due to Covid-19.

Type O Blood Linked To Lower Covid Risk Taking Vitamin D Unlikely To Help

5 Min Read

– The following is a roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus.

Certain blood groups less likely to get COVID-19

A large study adds to evidence that people with type O or Rh?negative blood may be at slightly lower risk from the new coronavirus. Among 225,556 Canadians who were tested for the virus, the risk for a COVID-19 diagnosis was 12% lower and the risk for severe COVID-19 or death was 13% lower in people with blood group O versus those with A, AB, or B, researchers reported on Tuesday in Annals of Internal Medicine. People in any blood group who were Rh-negative were also somewhat protected, especially if they had O-negative blood. People in these blood type groups may have developed antibodies that can recognize some aspect of the new virus, coauthor Dr. Joel Ray of St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto told Reuters. “Our next study will specifically look at such antibodies, and whether they explain the protective effect,” Ray said. Whether or how this information might influence COVID-19 prevention or treatment is still unclear.

Vitamin D fails to help in severe COVID-19 cases

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COVID-19 survivors benefit from home health care

Open tmsnrt.rs/3a5EyDh in an external browser for a Reuters graphic on vaccines and treatments in development.

Reporting by Nancy Lapid; Editing by Tiffany Wu

Unfortunately This Might Be A Covid Risk Factor That Can’t Be Controlled

The study’s authors pointed out that unlike other potentially high-risk conditions, nothing can be done to lessen the risk created by our genetic makeup. “Blood type is a challenge because it is inherited and not something we can change,” Stowell said. “But if we can better understand how the virus interacts with blood groups in people, we may be able to find new medicines or methods of prevention,” he added.

The study authors said the findings also raised even more questions that warranted further examination. “Does this really influence the ability of the virus to get into cells? Does it just influence its ability to adhere to the cells? That’s open-ended,” Stowell said. “We’re working on that right now, but the jury is still out.” And for more on how you can help improve your odds, check out These 3 Vitamins Could Save You From Severe COVID, Study Finds.

The Blood Type That Could Mean Youre More Likely To Die From Coronavirus

  • Vanessa Chalmers, Digital Health Reporter
    • Vanessa Chalmers, Digital Health Reporter
    • Invalid Date,

    PEOPLE with certain blood types are more likely to catch the coronavirus and die from it, scientists say.

    Their findings, using data from more than 225,500 people, add to mounting evidence that blood type is a risk indicator for Covid-19 disease.

    ?? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates

    There are four blood groups – A, B, AB and O. A person can either be positive or negative, meaning there are eight types in total. 

    What blood type you are will depend on the genetics from your parents.

    The most common blood group in the UK is O, making up almost half the population.

    And the majority of Britons are positive . Therefore type O+ is the most common blood type in the UK.

    The rarest blood group is AB, accounting for three per cent of people. Only one per cent of the population are AB-.

    The latest study involved thousands of volunteers in Canada. They had all had a blood test between 2007 and 2019 to determine their type. 

    Participants had also had a Covid test between January and June of this year.

    Study Finds No Relationship Between Blood Type And Severity Of Covid

    Research

    This article is part of Harvard Medical School’s continuing coverage of medicine, biomedical research, medical education and policy related to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic and the disease COVID-19.

    Blood type is not associated with a severe worsening of symptoms in people who have tested positive for COVID-19, report Harvard Medical School researchers based at Massachusetts General Hospital.

    Their findings, published in the Annals of Hematology, dispel previous reports that suggested a correlation between certain blood types and COVID-19.

    Get more HMS news here

    The study did find, however, that symptomatic individuals with blood types B and AB who were Rh positive were more likely to test positive for COVID-19, while those with blood type O were less likely to test positive.

    “We showed through a multi-institutional study that there is no reason to believe being a certain ABO blood type will lead to increased disease severity, which we defined as requiring intubation or leading to death,” said senior study author Anahita Dua, HMS assistant professor of surgery at Mass General.

    “This evidence should help put to rest previous reports of a possible association between blood type A and a higher risk for COVID-19 infection and mortality,” Dua said.

    People With Type O Blood Had ‘reduced Susceptibility’ To Infection

    Are Some People More Likely to get Coronavirus on the ...

    The second new study found that people with Type O blood may be at a lower risk of getting he coronavirus in the first place relative to people with other blood types.

    The team examined nearly half a million people in the Netherlands who were tested for COVID-19 between late February and late July. Of the roughly 4,600 people who tested positive and reported their blood type, 38.4% had Type O blood. 

    That’s lower than the prevalence of Type O in a population of 2.2 million Danish people, 41.7%, so the researchers determined that people with Type O blood had disproportionately avoided infection.

    “Blood group O is significantly associated with reduced susceptibility,” the authors wrote.

    It’s Real Says Researcher About Link Of Blood Type And Covid Risk

    According to the new study, those with Type A blood are more likely to become infected with COVID-19 due to the blood type providing a “stickier” environment for the virus to cling to. 

    “It’s real, it’s on the ground and now it’s getting us a little bit of understanding of what’s causing it,” said Dr. John Armitage with the OBI, who started offering free antibody tests to blood donors in July, per Oklahoma’s News 4. After looking at all of the blood samples, they noticed a larger number of donors with type A or AB blood types had COVID-19 antibodies compared to those with type O. “We saw a 2.5% difference in the results we get back from those two different types of donors,” he said.

    They believe it is because those with A type blood “have a substance very similar to their A blood group that’s lining their lungs and their bronchi and respiratory tract,” Armitage explained. 

    “If you think of a family – maybe somebody picks up the virus in a family from an event or they’ve been traveling together – maybe it’s a married couple and somebody gets the infection and the other doesn’t – it might be related to blood group, somebody might be more susceptible with that A,” Armitage said.

    RELATED: Dr. Fauci Just Said This is the Best Vaccine to Get

    People With Type O And Negative Blood Less Likely To Catch Covid

    Monit KhannaMoreover, negative blood types like O-, A-, B-, or AB- are on average, 21 percent less likely to get the virus

    With each passing day, the novel coronavirus is taking a tighter grip on the lives of humans around the world. 

    Whether it’s sanitising our hands regularly or wearing masks all the time, we’re leaving no stone unturned and yet it’s infecting hundreds of people around the world every day. 

    Reuters

    However, now, a new study has revealed that our blood group could be responsible for us contracting or not contracting the novel coronavirus

    Researchers from the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences in Toronto looked at 225,556 people who had a blood test between 2007 and 2019, and a COVID-19 swab this year. Out of the 225,556 individuals, 36.3 per cent had blood type A, 4.5 per cent had type AB, 14.9 per cent had type B, and 44.3 per cent had type O.

    Statistical analysis including all variables and comorbidities revealed that risk of contracting SARS CoV-2 was 15 percent higher in type AB blood compared to type A. People with type O blood are 12 percent less likely to catch the novel coronavirus when compared to other blood types. Moreover, negative blood types like O-, A-, B-, or AB- are on average, 21 percent less likely to get the virus.   

    Reuters

    Other Studies Found A Similar Link Between Blood Type And Covid

    In general, your blood type depends on the presence or absence of proteins called A and B antigens on the surface of red blood cells — a genetic trait inherited from your parents. People with O blood have neither antigen. It’s the most common blood type: About 48% of Americans have Type O blood, according to the Oklahoma Blood Institute

    The new studies about blood type and coronavirus risk align with prior research on the topic. A study published in July found that people with Type O were less likely to test positive for COVID-19 than those with other blood types. An April study, too, found that among 1,559 coronavirus patients in New York City, a lower proportion than would be expected had Type O blood.

    And in March, a study of more than 2,100 coronavirus patients in the Chinese cities of Wuhan and Shenzhen also found that people with Type O blood had a lower risk of infection.

    People With Type O Blood Are Less Likely To Catch Coronavirus

    Daily Mail

    People with a type O blood are 12 per cent less likely to catch the coronavirus than other blood types, a study has found. 

    It also reveals that those with a negative blood type are, on average, 21 per cent less likely to get the virus than people with a positive type.

    Individuals with type O or negative blood are also 13 per cent and 19 per cent less likely to develop severe symptoms or die, respectively. 

    In the UK, around 15 per cent of the population have a negative blood type and almost half are type O. 

    Around one in eight people are O-, which are 26 per cent less likely to get infected and 28 per cent less likely to develop severe symptoms or die. 

    Scroll down for video  

    Researchers from the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences in Toronto studied 225,556 people who had a blood test between 2007 and 2019 and a Covid swab this year. 

    Every person has one of four blood types, either A, B, AB or O and the difference in blood groups depends on the presence or absence of specific attachments on red blood cells called antigens.  

    There are two antigens, A and B. An individual can have one of these, both or none . 

    The presence, or absence, of these molecules dictates what blood type a person is. 

    There is another antigen, but there are not four possibilities, just two, and this is called the Rhesus antigen. 

    Erroneously named after the monkey, a person is either Rh positive or Rh negative.   

    ‘everybody Needs To Be More Careful Regardless Of Blood Type

    Despite the growing body of research suggesting some link between COVID-19 and blood type, experts say these studies don’t change much for the individual. It’s unlikely that doctors will make treatment decisions based on blood type, Silverstein says, and he cautions that blood type should not be considered on the same level of risk as age, obesity or other underlying health conditions.

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    The Blood Type Resulted In Slightly Lower Risk Of Infection

    The researchers found that people with blood type O had a lower chance of severe COVID illness or death compared to people with other blood types.

    Additionally, people with Rh-negative blood were found to have a lower probability of both infection and serious COVID-19 illness than people with Rh-positive blood.

    “The O and Rh? blood groups may be associated with a slightly lower risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection and severe COVID-19 illness,” the researchers concluded.

    Are People With Type A Blood More Likely To Die From Covid

    So people with Type A may be more likely to catch the virus, but whether they also get it worse is still unclear: the NEJM study reports that people with Type A blood were also more likely to have respiratory failure.

    However, the research out of Columbia University found there wasn’t really any difference among intubations or death and different blood types. And a recently released study in the Annals of Hematology looked specifically at the link between blood types and the need for intubation or death in confirmed COVID-19 patients. They found no link between blood type and the severity of the illness. The new research in Blood Advances, mentioned above, had similar findings. Although true to the unending questions aroung this new disease, another, smaller study, also in Blood Advances, suggested that blood types A or AB had higher risk of certain intense interventions and longer ICU stays, but the researchers themselves considered the link to be so far “unresolved.”


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